The Editor Responds to a Proselytizing Sheeple


It is truly no wonder that Christians compare themselves with sheep. They are indeed just as bland, stupid, and gullible, hence, the term Sheeple. I would like to comment, as editor, writer, and content manager of this blog, on one such “Christian” who chose to his demise to make some unwarranted assumptions about this blog. This is not a personal indictment of the reader but a general comment on what the reader has to say about this blog, in particular a single article published on this blog.


Mr Tomas Gacio recently added a comment to our article on Kirsten Gillibrand, “Message to Kirsten Gillibrand: Stop sending the message enabling personal depravity! Mr Gacio should pull his proselytizing head out of his sheeple butt and wake up, quite honestly.  Speaking of “Honestly,” Mr Gacio writes:

“Honestly ask yourself, as writer or even content manager of this blog, if the content and/or tone of this article is reflective of the attitude of Christ. Not commenting on the actual ideology presented by the writer. It is always good when communication occurs, and by all means exercise that right. That being said, surely there is a better way to express those views. This is a christian blog. Is this the tone you think reflects the body of Christ best?”

Mr Gacio starts off on the right track when he writes:  “I is always good when communication occurs…,” but then derails himself when he continues, “…surely there is a better way to express those views.” In other words, communication is “good” but only when it is done in a manner that he approves of. Typical of the vast majority, isn’t he?

Honestly, YES. If you are referring to the ostensibly Buddhist teachings of the mythological Christ of your brand of institutionalized religion, we’d have to go a long way with lies, error, propaganda, hypocrisy to even come close to the Christian spirit to which you refer.

First of all, this is NOT a CHRISTIAN BLOG!!! That, sir, is your first mistake. Your second mistake is not familiarizing yourself with the blog as a whole and not with a single article about a self-serving, evil, political hack, Kirsten Gillibrand. She and her feminist ilk are unnatural in every respect of the word, and, like liberation theology anti-popes (did I mention any names, Francis?), and absentee, Mardi Gras bishops (did I mention any names Edward?), and the so-called Christians who are ethical and holy for a full 45 minutes a week, is a travesty of her fiduciary duties owed to the public and a parody of her oath of office. But then, that could be said about most if not all American politicians and clergy.

Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany Bishop Edward Scharfenberger demonstrating poverty.

This blog is not published to reflect the so-called body of Christ. Christ who? The myth? The fiction? The ideology? The syncretic rites, rituals and theologies? The atrocities, the aberrations, the abominations? The body of Christ to which you refer is corrupt, decaying, and rightly so! The body of Christ to which you are apparently referring have been untrustworthy stewards, have bankrupted their treasury of possible virtues and values, have become temple prostitutes, and have far exceeded the hypocrisy of the Pharisees. Worse still, they are ignorant and make no effort to correct that deplorable state of being.

The body of christ today.

No, sir, far from being Christian in any sense of the current perversion of the word, this blog is NOT CHRISTIAN, and in no way whatsoever intends to reflect the body of any concocted christ or the highly edited writings of self-interested first-to-eighth century politicians — excuse me, you’d probably want to call them Church Fathers, absentee fathers in many respects —, who in their own time spoke to a very small minority, a minority who would sooner kill each other off than dialogue, and who were and continue to be grossly misunderstood, misinterpreted, used and abused, distorted, and the list goes on, why belabor the point.

Yes, I do sometimes resort to Christian scripture to make a point.

And yet Mr Gacio, vested in greater Spielbergian brilliance than Albany’s own Edward Scharfenberger, comes to the defense of a temple whore (a whore of the temple of Capitol Hill), claiming (in gross error) that this blog, as a “Christian blog” [sic, recte “honest”] does not reflect the “body of Christ.”

The short answer: No. It does not. And it will not. Be grateful.

Thank you Mr Gacio for making our point about the fast-diminishing faith tradition calling itself  “Christian,” and about the fast-decaying “body of Christ,” neither of which are the core subject matter of this blog, nor have they ever been.

Thank you for your comment and for the opportunity to respond.

The Editor

My only change would be to write “God” with a lower case, since god is a verb. (Editor)

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Why don’t funeral directors just ask?


“This article is not going to endear me to many funeral directors but I’m willing to take the risk for the sake of the best care for the bereaved.” [the Author]

At a recent funeral service at one of my regular funeral homes I was working with a funeral director, who recently joined the team. We had a moment to chat and I asked him why I was not seeing any referrals or cases from him. It was very unusual because the other funeral directors on staff called frequently with requests for services. His answer was a bit shocking: “They don’t ask.” He meant the bereaved families don’t ask.

Well, when a funeral director takes the first call alerting him of a death, or when the family comes in for the arrangements meeting, they shouldn’t have to ask. Part of deathcare is asking the right questions and the religion- spirituality question”, or even “Would you like to speak to our bereavement chaplain about the service?” or “Would you like us to have our chaplain join us at the arrangements meeting?” are among the “right” questions.

Asking the right questions; giving the right answers.
The arrangements meeting.

The fact is, any funeral director should be trained and interested enough to ask all the right questions; after all, the family is coming to the funeral director to have him or her ask the right questions and give the right answers. I have never met a family facing the recent death of a loved one come in with a laundry list of Questions to Ask. Families don’t have a FAQs page when in the grip of acute bereavement! Wake up! You deathcare professionals — if I can use the term “deathcare” these days — need to re-join the care team.

Get it done and move on!

Reason No. 1: Time

One of the reasons for this conspicuous thoughtlessness and lack of real compassion is that most mortuary science programs don’t teach deathcare; they teach the business of funeral directing and how to pass the boards. When a graduate finishes his two-year course, he goes into a one-year residency program with a funeral home, where he again learns the “business.” He has to sell the funeral home’s facilities, their merchandise, the skills of the preparation team, and his time. Of course there are the other items like removal of the deceased, paperwork required by law and cemeteries, etc. But it’s all about the “product.” What the funeral director is selling is turnkey disposal of the deceased, and he’s doing that with time in mind. It’s a question of turnaround. Finish up this case, get back to the funeral home, get the messages and move on to the next removal. All of this involves time.

So the real reason most bereaved families don’t get spiritual, religious, or officiant services is because the funeral director does not ask. The funeral director doesn’t ask because such services are not part of what he sells; he has to get them from the outside, and he calls those costs “out-of-pocket” expenses, because either he has to pay them and get reimbursed or the family pays for them directly. He or she does not ask because a religious or spiritual funeral service takes time — it adds about an hour to the entire program. And those hours add up and translate into dollars, thousands of dollars for the funeral home. Keep the disposal time down to a minimum and feed the bottom line.

The regrettable fact today is that most funeral directors spend very little time with the family or the survivors, the bereaved. He probably receives the first call through a third party answering service, he makes the removal as quickly and cleanly as possible, he sits through the arrangements meeting with the family and showcases his services and merchandise, greets the family and mourners at the door, and stands by during the visitation hours (usually 3-4 hours at most), if any, and stands by and directs the final viewing and funeral (usually 2-3 hours). That’s it. The only direct contact with the family is perhaps 1 hour during removal and during the arrangements meeting. The rest of the 2-7 hours of visitation and funeral operations he’s standing by, ensuring that things go per script, and there’s little or no contact with the bereaved, much less any attempt at bereavement support. That’s the chaplain’s job but what if there’s no chaplain to do that?

Corporate and Factory Funerals Services.

The situation is even worse with the factory funeral services providers like Newcomer and Service Corporation International (SCI and their Dignity Memorial). These corporations work on volume and marketing. They offer “the lowest cost” in the area and then pick up the slack with factory-style services and nickle-and-diming the bereaved with the little “extras.” If your thought the small funeral home operator was on a tight schedule, you haven’t experienced the factory funerals. Because funeral homes work with a time-focus, they are likely to promote the easiest and quickest disposal methods to the bereaved, using the sales pitch that “it’s the least expensive” of the disposal methods: direct cremation or direct burial. Nothing between death and disposal. Grandpa dies, gets carted off and shipped directly to the crematorium, or he gets buried almost immediately. No frills, no time lost. After all, you have better things to do with your time than deal with death. Right? Funeral director gets back for the next case, and the relatives get on with whatever they think is more important than honoring their dead.

Reason No. 2:  Money

While time in the funeral services business may equate with money more than in other businesses, money and expenses factor into this dehumanizing equation.

While cutting quality of services.

But leaving the fact that time is money for a moment, a well-orchestrated funeral or memorial service can be complicated and involve additional costs. Of course, the funeral director does not have to pay those costs but he does have to persuade the family to agree to them and ultimately to pay for them. There was a time when the deceased was laid out for 2-3 viewings: the first was the family private viewing. The next evening would be the visitation viewing when friends and acquaintances would “pay their respects,” and offer condolences to the family. The third viewing, if there were one, would be a public viewing, perhaps with a prayer service, or it would be on the morning of the actual funeral either in the funeral home or crematorium chapel, or in a church or temple, followed by the procession to the place of final disposition. Those days are gone. History.

While all of this added time to the event and locked up the funeral home’s resources for the duration, such a funeral also required additional arrangements (time etc.), equipment (vehicles, transportation, etc.), personnel, and outside professionals (clergy), and even outside facilities (church, chapel). Today’s funerals are much different in terms of visitation and receiving friends and acquaintances: There may be a funeral home chapel service before processing to the place of final disposition. There may or may not be a wake or prayer service or even a public viewing the day before the actual funeral. In other words, the funeral home facilities have become one of the products sold and all other services have been cut to the absolute minimum, including any bereavement support and any spiritual or religious support.

In other words, by not asking or offering bereavement support in the form of spiritual or religious services, the funeral home is saving time and, hence, money. The funeral director saves time and effort by not asking if the family wants spiritual or religious support, and he doesn’t bring up the subject. He thus does not have to plan in the time for coordinating with the chaplain or clergyman nor does he have to tie up personnel and facilities and time for an in-house funeral service, much less an off-site church service.

The savvy funeral director is aware that if he doesn’t offer, the bereaved are unlikely to ask for spiritual or religious services.

There is an exception to this “rule:” Many funeral homes have close connections with a local church or several churches for a very special reason: when a congregation or parish member dies, he gets the body and the pastor gets the honorarium for the use of the church and for officiating at the funeral. This is the one instance where the pastor or the church administrator will promote the services of the funeral director and the funeral director ensures that the church gets the case. That’s why we most often see a funeral home sponsoring a church’s calendar and advertising in the church bulletin. Funeral director and pastor tend to partner and profit by this relationship. Funeral home gets the body and the pastor gets the honorarium. Works well for both. And at least the family gets the appearance of religion or spirituality but it’s just the appearance. We’ve all experienced the funeral service where the officiant clergyman has no idea who the person was but does the service anyway. That’s insensitive and unethical. But it apparently works for most everybody, however.

Reason No. 3: Ignorance

As I mentioned above, most graduates of mortuary science programs learn how to run a funeral services business, that is, the body disposal business. Most graduates leave the program with little or no understanding of spirituality or religion, or even of the psychology of grief and coping with bereavement. They go through the coursework and the motions but what they’re really interested in is the business. After all, it’s one of the only businesses that will always have a customer pool.

I have to ask: “How much can anyone learn about these fundamentally human aspects of deathcare in a mere two-year course that includes business studies, including business law and the legal aspects of deathcare, the basic sciences of death and post-mortem preparation of the deceased, cosmetology, etc.”

Truth be told, many young people go into the mortuary science programs with the best of intentions but then something ugly happens; they see what was once a noble profession from the inside. It’s like admiring a beautiful medieval tapestry and then looking at the back and seeing the ugly knots and strings. What’s more, at 18 or 21 years old, they generally lack the maturity to make good judgments and they have no life experience to fuel any sort of wisdom. They go in as sponges and come out saturated with misconceptions and deranged values. So now you are sitting across from an ignorant 20-something funeral director who is going to tell you all about death and grief! He could be your grandson!!!

Here’s my point: A professional chaplain will have at least a four-year undergraduate degree and then at least a professional degree at the master’s level (masters degree in pastoral studies, religion, theology, or the gold-standard professional degree, the Master of Divinity). For example, a very good friend of mine has a graduate degree in psychology with a degree in literature, and a master of divinity degree, plus formal healthcare chaplaincy training. Most masters degrees require only 12-30 credits of graduate level study; the masters degree in divinity requires at least 75-90, frequently up to 120 credits of graduate level study! In other words, the professional chaplain is likely to have as much training as a physician, and at least 2-3x more training than most graduate degree programs. A professional chaplain is also very likely better trained that the vast majority of so-called denominational clergy, most of whom get their credentials from a so-called denominational “bible school” or from some unaccredited school of ministry. The bible-school graduates are cheap but ineffectual; the real professionals are not all that expensive but are professionals and some ignorant business owners don’t like to get too involved with professionals.

So who do you think is the best qualified to provide acute, short-term, or long-term bereavement support?

Please don’t misunderstand what I am saying here. Many funeral directors are very intelligent, skilled, and compassionate people who have chosen a very thankless, but very essential line of work. While there are some crooks and some very incompetent weasels among them as in any profession, most are very good at what they do: (1) serve the public in an essential role, (2) run a business, (3) participate in important community organizations and activities. From personal experience, I have worked with some saints but have also to admit that I have experienced some real ignorant sickos.

But today the bottom line is unquestionably business success, and that means turnover. Turnover is important in the short term because it provides the funeral director with a lifestyle; in the long-term it shows that the business can make money and, when it comes to retirement time, the funeral director wants to sell the business for as much as he can get. My point is that the funeral director is not trained to provide bereavement support or religious/spiritual support, or even to officiate or to design a funeral service; he’s trained in the business and technology of body disposal and running a funeral home.[1]

Reason No. 4: They don’t care.

While ignorance is not restricted only to the scope of training but can also be observed on the personal level in some funeral directors. It can come into play in other ways: a “not knowing” that results in “not caring” or indifference to the spiritual needs of the customer. Or, the funeral director has a more subtle agenda: he simply does not believe or does not have a connection with spirituality or religion, or he is simply anticlerical or anti-religion, and, paradoxically, he man not feel comfortable talking about the subject of death and spirituality much less even including it in their offerings. He doesn’t care what the bereaved believe, he doesn’t believe that is important.

And then you have the feminist funeral director whose main objective is to make an incursion into what was historically a male-dominated profession. Her self-loathing and hatred of being a woman blinds her to all else, including the needs of the bereaved. Like so many women who enter into previously male-dominated professions, they exaggerate everything, even the insincerity and unauthentic compassion they offer. They have an agenda, not a vocation. But that’s not limited to the funeral business.

That is a problem in many ways but the most insidious way is that they are promoting personal beliefs at the expense of individuals in a very vulnerable situation who might benefit from religious or spiritual support. Moreover, the funeral director in such situations in in a control and power situation vis-à-vis the bereaved, and is misusing that situation in an unethical manner. Again, ethics is not a hot topic in mortuary science curricula, unless it’s basic ethics to keep the potential funeral director out of legal hot water.

If a funeral director finds he does not believe or is anticlerical or anti-religion and, during the arrangements meeting finds that the family has a faith or belief tradition, whether they practice or not, he should refer the case to a colleague who can best serve that family. You can be certain that in the very policy-aligned corporate funeral homes (Newcomer, Service Corporation International, Dignity, etc.) this is not going to happen. It probably won’t happen even in a larger privately owned funeral home group.


This article was inspired by the statement of a funeral director, which in turn resulted in reflection on why an experienced deathcare provider would make such a statement. It is not my intention to indict any funeral director or to paint all funeral directors in the same color, but to make the point that regardless of the reasonable presumption that the funeral director is a business man and, for obvious reasons, must operate a funeral home as a business, there are some essential services that must be offered, even if the client does not specifically or explicitly request them, and which might require the funeral director to make the effort to ask directly, “Have you given any thought to a religious or spiritual service as part of the final arrangements?” or at least to review the death documents to ascertain whether the deceased had a religious or spiritual preference, and then proceeding on the basis of that information. It’s as simple as that.

If they don’t ask, you ask. Period.


This article is courtesy of Compassionate Care Associates, marriage celebrants and funeral and memorial officiants serving the Greater Capital District Area of Albany, Schenectady, Rensselaer, Columbia, Ulster, Greene counties in New York. Visit the website at Compassionate Care Associates.


[1] I do know some clergy who are “working clergy,” that is, they are ordained by their denomination as clergy but work in the funeral services sector as “funeral directors.” Depending on the denomination, their “clergy” training may be minimal or it may be accredited by a national or international agency, but they are denominational clergy, that is, they are trained in a specific faith or belief tradition, and are bound by that tradition. They don’t bite the hand that feeds them. A professional interfaith chaplain may be ordained or licensed but he does not serve a specific denomination, and he is most likely adept in several faith or belief traditions as well as in non-religious traditions. That’s the big difference between denominational clergy and the interfaith chaplain. To ensure the best service, the best choice is the professional interfaith chaplain.

Furthermore, the interfaith professional chaplain likely specializes in a narrow field of expertise such as bereavement, crisis intervention, healthcare, etc. Beware, though, of the so-called “board-certified” log-rollers and club members; the board-certified chaplain is no better than the denominational clergyman; both serve a master and that master is not the bereaved or the client! The majority of “board-certified” log-rollers have little or no training in ministry, theology, pastoral care, or religious studies. If you hear the words “evidence based” you know they’re robots. Membership in an organization and that organization’s “certification” keeps the organization in business but doesn’t to a thing for the bereaved. Most are narcissists and incompetent. Same generally applies to most careerist clergy.

 


New Group: Celebrating Creation


Serving the community and Social Justice and Engagement!

We’ve been contacted by a new group in the Capital District Area and asked for our support. Consistent with our social justice and community support platform, we have decided to support the group. It’s so unique we think it should get all the support it can get.

Now, seriously, this is no scam. We’ve done our homework as usual and have gotten the facts and verified them. But, as always, we let the group speak for itself and here’s what the spokesperson has to say about the group:

“We are a group of gay men who are passionate about the outdoors, hiking, and backpacking. There are many terrific and challenging trails in this part of the country, particularly in New York and Vermont. Our group is mixed, that is, it’s made up of experienced trekkers and novices, but all are welcome. We have one thing that sets us apart from all the rest on the trails: we are all Celts either by ancestry or spirit, and we live many of the Celtic traditions and culture, particularly the kilt. We hike the trails in kilts!” [Name withheld by Editor.]

Kilted Celts on the Trails.
You GO! guys!

Given the amount of negative material to cover in this Diocese and Capital District region, this group seems to have a lot going for it. Albany’s support of the traditional American Celtic holiday honoring the Roman Catholic Irish bishop, St Patrick and his feast day, was paltry at best. There were few musical or cultural events to commemorate the holiday or the Celtic traditions. Of course, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany was as dull as usual.  But the immorality of the Albany Machine wasn’t going to disappoint and, as usual, all you could find were drunks, fights, police patrols, and the usual Albany attractions.

We applaud innovation and courage and these guys seem to have a good dose of each. Bravo for them! We’d like to see more like them out there appreciating the beauty of creation so accessible in this Central New York area, taking care of nature and just being a part of the world. The Gay Kiltics (that’s not a misspelling, it’s what they’re called) could be a lesson for all of you locals whose mission in life apparently is to kill, destroy, litter, pollute, and just generally be ugly!

Anyone interested in joining us in supporting the group or even in joining the group can contact Gay Kiltics Hiking and Backpacking.

The Smalbany blog is supporting the Gay Keltics Hiking and Backpacking group as a community organization  but is not the contact for information about or for the group. This blog supports the group but is not the contact for the group. Please direct all of your inquiries to the group at Gay Kiltics Hiking and Backpacking.

Checking out the scenery.
Happy Springtime!
The Editor

 


We said: “Don’t Let It Happen! It depends on YOU!”



George Orwell A Final Warning


“If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face—for ever.”
― George Orwell, 1984

George Orwell A Final Warning

We said, “Don’t let it happen, it depends on you!”
And you let it happen!


Never was a truer statement made…


This cartoon makes a powerful statement. Any comments?

We’re preparing an article to appear very soon on this blog. The subject is how the Church can be a thief, especially in her efforts to make money through “education” institutions, retreats, etc.

We have received a number of reports about the pirate Church and how it preaches one thing and practices quite another. Priests and nuns in designer clothes, jewelry. Clergy and lay religious dining in top-shelf restaurants. Clergy and lay religious driving expensive cars. Clergy and lay religious and travel/vacations. There was a time when clergy would not be allowed to have more than the poorest member of their congregation. Times sure have changed.

Did you say “poverty”?
Edward Scharfenberger
Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany (New York)

We’d be interested if our readers would share some personal stories and insights on the subject.

Really?!?

Thank you!
The Editor


Chaplain Harold’s June Newsletter is Online and Ready to Read and Download!


Click the link below to read/download the June Newsletter (June 2018 Newsletter Vol 1 No. 2 ).

Click here to read/download the May Newsletter.

 


What’s Wrong With You People?!? St Patrick’s Ravena


When, after several attempts to get information and answers from the administration at St Patrick’s Roman Catholic Church in Ravena, New York, we finally contacted the Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany, asking “What’s Wrong With You People?!?” As expected, we didn’t get a response.

RC Diocese, Parish Indifferent to Welfare of Parents, Children

Confirmation Rites Slated for 6-8 p.n. on a Sunday!

For several months we’ve been listening to complaints from various people about St Patrick’s Roman Catholic Church in Ravena, New York, and their obvious failures to communicate, or their lay ministers’ aggressive attitude towards those who might question or have questions. We didn’t think this was right behavior for a community of so-called Christians, especially by those who are of and in the community of lay persons but may have a particular non-canonical (unestablished by canon law) job or ministry in the parish community such as the so-called director of religious instruction.

The church’s cold exterior is rivaled only by the cold and indifferent attitude of parish administrators and diocesan hierarchy!

With the upcoming conferral of the Roman Catholic sacrament of Confirmation at St Patrick’s in Ravena on Sunday, April 22, 2018, for centuries a community event to be celebrated by those confirmed, their families and friends, the questions were many but few were answered.

We decided that for the community’s benefit we would get the details straight from the pastor and his minions, publish the details, and the community would know.

We were incredibly mistaken to believe that the closed circuit of parish communications in the Roman Catholic parish or the Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany, for ever locked boxes of information, would all of a sudden burst open with a sense of community sharing. In fact, we sent no less than three (3) separate requests to the pastor of St Patrick Roman Catholic Church in Ravena, Scott vanDerveer, to his parish deacon, Steven Young, and to lay coordinator, Christa Derosiers (Faith Formation) requesting details about the event. We didn’t receive even the courtesy of an acknowledgment of our requests, much less the information we were requesting. Imagine! Three separate requests to a parish, a so-called community of faithful Christians, requesting information on an important community event, and none of the self-important hypocrites can take the time to answer. The questions continue as do the uncertainties surrounding the event.

What’s wrong with you people?

In desperation we contacted several offices of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany, including the bishop’s office, asking “What’s wrong with you people!” and, as expected, we didn’t receive a response.

Derosiers appears to have assumed the role of “gate keeper” and takes a particularly nasty attitude when approached by parents seeking information

Scott VanDerveer, pastor of St Patrick, Ravena.

The parish pastor, Scott VanDerveer and the bishop’s representative in the parish, the deacon, Steven Young, are responsible for the operations of the parish under canon law. The lay persons, like Krista Derosiers, performing certain jobs in the parish like so-called “faith formation,” and other lay ministries, are answerable to the pastor, who in turn is answerable to the bishop. It appears no one seems to think they are answerable to the community, not even to the parents in the parish. In fact, Derosiers appears to have assumed the role of “gate keeper” and takes a particularly nasty attitude when approached by parents seeking information. One parent even admitted that because of Derossiers’ attitude she, the parent, was a little uncomfortable leaving her child unaccompanied, fearing retaliation would be visited upon the innocent child. How can such an atmosphere exist in what is supposed to be a place of love and peace? Well, that’s Ravena for you.

But the Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany is too busy dressing up in carnival colors and playing politics to be bothered with the concerns of the faithful. That’s obvious if you visit the Dioceses’ website and see the dozens of offices, departments, etc. Not many of those departments and offices appear even remotely connected with the thousands of souls they include in their rolls—many of whom have long since ceased practicing their faith and avoid the Church all together, as well as those who are actively leaving the Catholic Church. It seems the Catholic hierarchy don’t really give a damn because they are too busy competing with the Evangelicals in the Third World for souls; the more ignorant the soul the easier it is to control.

RC Diocese of Albany chief rulemaker, bishop E. Scharfenberger.

The Roman Catholic church has a long history of political activity and misdeeds so the conduct in the microcosm, Ravena, should not come as a surprise to anyone, really. It’s all a smoke and mirrors act.

What’s even worse is that the current Albany Roman Catholic bishop, Edward Schwarzenberger, isn’t going to confirm the kids. That’s not all that surprising, since he’s usually in NYC or otherwise invisible in Albany. Ailing retired bishop Howard Hubbard, bishop emeritus, is going to confirm the kids. Where will Scharfenberger be on April 22nd? Probably getting fitted for another one of  his psychedelic bishop costumes he’s become famous for modeling. Well, there’s really no accounting for taste — or the lack of it.

Well, here’s the proof of the craziness in the Church. You see, we’ve already reported on some of the incredible burocracy of the Roman Catholic Church, using the Ravena parish as an example. If you need to refresh your memory, please read our article “Roman Catholic Parishes Use Collection Envelopes (and their Contents) to Determine a Catholic “in good standing”!” and prepare to be very disgusted.

It’s uncanny how indifferent the Roman Catholic parish of St Patrick in Ravena can actually be not only to the public, to those seeking correct and complete information, but to their own children and families! The whole Confirmation event is a clear example of how a so-called Church, the “mystical body of Christ”, can be so un-Christian! Here’s how:

Parents of the young men and women to be confirmed were kept in the dark for months regarding the date and time of the rituals, and then they received conflicting information! Despite the fact that the young men and women to be confirmed had been attending preparation classes for about two years, parents were kept in the dark until only two months before the actual date for the event. First the event was to be at St Patrick’s in Ravena, then at St Mary’s in Coxsackie, then separately, then combined. WTF?!?

Catholic Confusion.

Well, we have learned thru the grapevine (no pun intended) that the Confirmation rites are to be held on Sunday, April 22, 2018, at St Patrick’s Roman Catholic Church in Ravena, presided over by Albany Roman Catholic bishop emeritus Howard Hubbard. The time for the ceremonies is incredible, a classic example of poor planning, planning convenient only to the organization, planning that is so outrageous that it could only happen in a Roman Catholic parish!!!

The Confirmation is slated to take place on Sunday evening, between 6 and 8 p.m. That’s on a Sunday evening when the kids have school the next day and parents, relatives, and friends have either to attend classes or go to work the next morning!!!

Many families have complained that relatives and friends who might have wanted to attend and share the joy of the experience cannot do so.

Many families have complained that relatives and friends who might have wanted to attend and share the joy of the experience cannot do so because of the day and the late hour of the ceremonies. We say that’s disgraceful of the Church to prevent a good portion of the family circle and the community from attending what is supposed to be an important sacred event for which the young people have been preparing literally for years!!!

It’s incredibly regrettable that the parents of the young people either have to plan to have the customary celebration reception either before the event or some time after the event. Just because it’s inconvenenient for some people in the Church organization!!!

But on a Sunday evening? That’s unheard of! And between 6 p.m. and 8 p.m.? That’s absolutely scandalous! That means the kids won’t be in bed before 10 p.m. and wasted for the next school day. What are those so-called Catholics in Albany thinking. Well, the way they respond to questions, we’ll never know. But according to one parent, Ms Derossiers arrogant response was “That’s the date and we can’t do anything about it.” Well, we know now with certainty, don’t we?

And they wonder why they’re hemorrhaging parishioners and closing parishes? DUH!!!

“Psychedelic Las Vegas” Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany Bishop Edward Scharfenberger demonstrating poverty.


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