Covering the Crucifix & Re: Advent Candles


In the question and answer part of Zenith a reader addresses the custom of covering the crucifix during Christmas and Easter:

My parish has a beautiful crucifix mounted on the wall behind the altar that has been a great aid in myprayer life. Unfortunately, I must pray without this aid during the seasons of Christmas and of Easter, as during these seasons the crucifix is completely covered. During Christmas, a star is placed above the crucifix with a tail that hangs down to completely cover it. Likewise, during Easter, a banner of the Risen Christ is hung over the crucifix so that it is hidden from view. I realize that “a cross, with the figure of Christ crucified upon it, [be] either on the altar or near it” during Mass (General Instruction of the Roman Missal, No. 308), and I considered the processional cross, which is placed beside the sanctuary during Mass, to fulfill this requirement when the crucifix behind the altar is covered (cf. GIRM, 122). However, upon further reflection, I now question if the processional cross fulfills this requirement as it is beside the sanctuary during Mass and not “next to the altar” (GIRM, 122); and, it is not “clearly visible to the [entire] assembled congregation” (GIRM, 308). As well, it does not “remain near the altar even outside of liturgical celebrations” (GIRM, 308). Is it appropriate that the crucifix mounted on the wall behind the altar be covered during any liturgical season? — R.G., Leduc, Alberta

Advent candles at Mass: From a liturgical point of view, only the blessing of the wreath on the first Sunday of Advent is included among those that may be used at Mass. This rite has received the approval of the Holy See for those countries that requested its inclusion in their translation and adaptation of the Book of Blessings. It is not found in the original Latin benedictional. There is no ceremony outside of Mass to light the candles on Sundays 2, 3 and 4 of Advent, I think that it is legitimate for the priest to do so at the very beginning of the first Mass of the corresponding Sunday (or Saturday evening) with no added rituals or texts.

 Legionary of Christ Father Edward McNamara, professor of liturgy at the Regina Apostolorum university responds. Read or download the entire article at  Covering the Crucifix.

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